When the worst dentist in America set up a franchise in Vancouver

Today’s archival blast from classifieds past, and our latest bolt down the rabbit hole of history, is an ad for a Vancouver dentist on October 3, 1917, who apparently was a dab hand at replacing lost teeth. His business problem? It appears some people needed convincing that having false teeth instead of holes in your mouth was important. “What good Continue Reading

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October 1917: Foy Family heads Vaudeville lineup at the Vancouver Orpheum

Eddie Foy and the Seven Younger Foys were a successful Vaudeville act that had toured extensively when they got to Vancouver’s Orpheum Theatre in October of 1917. The patriarch of the clan, Eddie Foy Sr., had been a multi-decade headliner, having worked his way up from mining towns to the biggest stages of North America, and was reportedly playing in Continue Reading

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1917 movie night: Fatty Arbuckle in ‘His Wedding Night’

There was no bigger comedy star in 1917 than Fatty Arbuckle. Arguably the biggest celebrity of the time, Arbuckle starred in and directed comedy shorts that were widely distributed and much loved. Until the third night of a three day party in 1921, during which starlet Virginia Rappe died. Arbuckle was accused of raping her, though later acquitted at the Continue Reading

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Classified ads, October 1917: The $200k widow, sack extravaganza, and give me back my dog – or else!

When diving back into the classified ad listings of yore, it’s easy to see why newspapers were such a popular item. The news was fine, the gossip interesting enough, but the classified ads were just a treasure trove of weirdness. Our first find in the October 1, 1917 Vancouver Daily Sun classified is an interesting – and ominous one. DOG Continue Reading

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Mainland Cigar Store, 1917: “It won’t hurt either you or us..”

October 1, 1917: Book this one as a prime example of shrug marketing, where the Mainland Cigar Store, then at 310 Carrall street in Gastown, came up with the amazing sales pitch of just straight giving up on quality, and instead offering their product as a cheap crappy option for those who can afford little more. JUST RECEIVED: A shipment Continue Reading

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Music on wax for $0.99 at Vancouver’s gramophone row, in 1917

October 1, 1917: Vancouverites enjoyed their music. In fact, the city has a rich musical tradition, having been one of North America’s jazz hubs through much of the 20th century, and a regular Vaudeville stop before that, with oodles of richly outfitted theatres and opera houses doing a brisk trade. But when Vancouver folk went indoors at night, as the Continue Reading

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